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Posts Tagged ‘yukon’

Call for Applications: KIAC Artist in Residence Program & ODD Gallery Exhibitions (Dawson City)

“Founded in 2001, in a partnership with Parks Canada, the KIAC Artist in Residence Program has welcomed over 300 talented artists, musicians and filmmakers to Dawson City from all regions of Canada and around the world. Our alumni include Sobey Art Award nominees, Western Canada Music Award winners, and prize-winning filmmakers from film festivals across the globe.

The residence accommodates two artists concurrently for research, development and production of ongoing or new bodies of work.

KIAC accepts applications from visual artists, media artists and interdisciplinary artists, as well as curators.

Consideration will be given to professional, established and emerging Canadian and international artists. All disciplines will be considered.

Artists may also have the opportunity to facilitate outreach programs such as talks, workshops and exhibitions, intended to promote interaction and professional development, and provide access to a diverse range of contemporary arts practices and theories within the community.

General Call residencies will run in February, April through June, and from August through December.

  • Applicants may apply for residencies 4–12 weeks in duration.
  • January, March/April, July to mid-August are reserved for specific residencies (Music Festival, Film Festival, The Natural & the Manufactured).
  • Film Festival Residency: This residency occurs annually during March/April, coinciding with the Dawson City International Short Film Festival on Easter Weekend (April 5-9, 2023).

Participants are responsible for all travel and personal expenses including food and materials related to their work.

For more information, please visit: https://kiac.ca/artist-in-residence-program/residence-application-guidelines/

-from KIAC


Submissions for 2023 Exhibitions are now open.
Deadline: February 15, 2022

The ODD Gallery accepts proposals from professional visual artists and curators working in all mediums and disciplines. Proposals will be considered for the 2022 exhibition season. The ODD Gallery encourages regional, national, and international proposals.”

For more information including submission details, please visit: https://kiac.ca/odd-gallery/calls-for-submissions/

-from KIAC

STORIES OF NOW: Nakai Theatre (Whitehorse)

Whistle Bend (Photo: Erik Pinkerton)

VignetteNakai Theatre http://nakaitheatre.com, Whitehorse, Yukon

 “STORIES OF NOW” is part of a project ArtBridges is working on with Judith Marcuse Projects’ ASCN (Arts for Social Change Network) and ICASC. It is about gathering and sharing stories emanating from the field now and about what issues and areas of focus matter. 

In conversation with: Jacob Zimmer, Artistic Director – Nakai Theatre, on November 29th, 2021. 

If you could tell a story about your community-engaged arts initiative now, this year, what would the story be about? What are the main themes?

JZ:   It’s about how we can contribute delightful surprises in a period of time covered by deeply non-delightful surprises. There are some other things we’re working on, but this is the main question: how to help artists working and engaging in joyful and delightful ways? We live in a time in which artists are mining personal tragedies and putting this into their work. We are supporting artists and supporting them in doing silly and delightful things. It’s not escapism, it’s not about denying the fact that the work is a tire fire – don’t throw more gasoline on it!  We need heat and light, but that doesn’t mean throwing our tires on the fire. Look around, find other points of light, head over near a campfire, sit around and have a conversation. What else can we do? There are lots of policies, systems, and communities we can work more closely with, but are not possible to at the moment.

What is possible for an arts organization, what is capacity for us? There is a funding incentive to think big. We do processions with puppets around Long Term Care (LTC) homes.  What is this doing? It’s bringing 15 minutes of delight into the residence for the residents. It’s important and it’s hard to track metrics on that. So when we don’t have the capacity to do indoor theater, what is successful is – we had relationships before (pandemic) with puppet makers and musicians. We pay the musicians. The artists parade around the LTC home at a social distance from residents. This puppet work was the most successful social change thing we’ve done. Another story is about participating in larger networks – this has been different then giant puppets. Being an advocate for these things in theatre – in crisis around COVID. We’re advocating for delight!

What are the main issues your community-engaged arts initiative faces? (e.g., social justice, environmental justice, pandemic-related, operational, financial, HR)

JZ:   Disconnection, social issues, social disconnection, depression, social cohesion. Gone to horrific levels, because of the pandemic. Things were already challenging in the North before. There are higher alienation rates, suicide, drop out rates.. It’s been multiplied in the pandemic. These puppets are trying to address that angst. So it’s less direct, less “on issue like policing and racist policies.

How has your initiative been addressing these main issues?

JZ:   We’re creating opportunities with ‘at a distance’ projects.  Artists come together to create weird and delightful puppets for their hub, or their pod, and then take the puppets out into the world – at a distance. The puppets are backpack-rigged puppets… we go to farmers markets and parks. They’re bringing delight. It’s not about selling anything – it’s a non-commercial delight. We’ve also gone into three Long Term Care homes in the area for a day of parading around outside of the buildings. These events work on the social cohesion and alienation question. It’s for the staff at these buildings too, we make sure they know we’re coming. They have hard jobs. This is what we can do – give a delightful surprise. We call, make arrangements with staff, it’s free and less bureaucratic. 

During March Break last year, we were in COVID mode, we told the youth participants “if you come every day we’ll pay you $750.” We were connecting arts with the document Together Today for Children Tomorrow. We were looking at that manifesto from the Yukon that led to the self-governance agreements. The document is approaching its 50th anniversary of leaders going to Ottawa to present to Trudeau senior. How can we connect art making with that visit? We did a March Break camp and connected artists and an elder with participants. We’re building on that project, that document. We’re using the network support to do this. We’re looking at working with the manifesto and what is also 50 years in the future? The kids are looking at it. What would the world, the Yukon be looking like in 2073?  What if we created an art project as a way to get out of a tire fire. We can’t put the fire out by ourselves, but we can dream a bigger world and help to dream about the future. Supporting artists up here – to work up here. We’re supporting Christine Genier on her work on Indigenous futurism and imagining a different world in science fiction. How do we imagine? This is what art can do for the social change.

Cooperidge (Photo: Erik Pinkerton)

How has the community of participants that your initiative engages with evolved in the past year (if at all)?

JZ:   For the puppets project, a different group showed up. Volunteers shifted because of COVID protocols this summer. It ruined youth getting together to make puppets. We’re entering into the 3rd year with the puppets. Can we make this part of what we do? This was an emergency response project. Previously we were developing theatre at the scale of the landscape –things seen at a distance. Now we’re looking at involving big puppetry work that traditionally, we were not actively doing. This has all been new. Before the pandemic it was the landscape question based on practice-based research, now more community-engaged art. We can’t bring academics together, don’t want to talk on zoom about working outside/landscapes, about what we can or cannot do. How can we help to work on some ideas now? We are further along in the landscape work. It’s different now going to LTC homes. We’re aware of the alienation at the LTC homes.

Community-engaged art accelerated compared with before the pandemic. All these things that were hard to explain to people before now became very obvious. ‘10 minutes of delight’ now means something. Visceral now – we see how important it is. There’s a scarcity of 10 minutes of delight. The giant parades – a parade of 15 people at the LTC home, works. It doesn’t push COVID barriers and doesn’t need corporate sponsorship. It’s more obvious why we chose to do this and we got funding to keep the artists going – to pay artists and commission them during CERB without going over their limits. We get together in a day to make a puppet. No one was asking about box office returns. People understood. We were doing things in a way others weren’t. It was the only thing we could do. The LTC homes are a clear, strong base. Now an outdoor event on Labour Day weekend – we partner with a music group, and do an installation. We’ve done 2 now. We’d like to keep this parade going. Labour Day is good. Not too cold, but it still gets dark before 10. A Low touch event, that includes a place to take instagram pictures. Light, puppets and joyful delights!  

How is your organization engaging with your community right now? (Logistics, pandemic public health and safety guidelines & policies, changes in the way we gather)

JZ:   We have a festival in the Yukon in January. A more traditional arts presenting framework.  We “pivot “ – that’s been stressful. We’re in a state of emergency now. From thinking we can sell 60 tickets and beer & wine tickets to 20 tickets and no beer and wine. How do we create events that people would like to go to? Bring joy? The anxiety of the disease is overruling joy & delight. People aren’t going out as much. We created a sunroom and turned on lights, we put in flowers. People can book the sunroom for 30 minutes. We’re trying. Every time COVID shifts we all stressfully deal with a bunch of things. It’s hard to do community building, change. All future planning is on hold. We all have to deal with adaptation. This is hard. It’s hard to interact with the school system and youth. What feels safe? Rapid shifts are tiring and challenging. HR is a problem. We don’t always have the people who can lead a project. As an organization leader, I can see need and opportunity. I’m a white dude from away. How best to support people who can lead? Nation building, people are on the Executive Council. They’d like to do it but they are doing nation building, they have busy and important family lives. Many have left and gone south. We can be in a situation where we have money but not always have capacity. I’ve been here for 4 years. Nakai is an organization – a professional company of 42 years. It takes time to rebuild relationships. We are a three-person organization. There’s less institutional memory. The next AD may have different ideas of theater through the territory – it’s community focused, professionally run. We had done so much work to not be ‘community arts’ – the idea of volunteering for Nakai, wasn’t such a thing. Nakai has jump started direct work with community. This has pushed that into being lived experience. No travel going on. 

What are one or two new projects your initiative implemented this year?

JZ:   Puppets parading at LTC homes. March break work with participants…all this began during this time.

March Break Camp

What is your initiative doing new–digitally–compared to pre-pandemic?

JZ:   The puppets are intentionally non-digital. We are more truthful about storytelling around it. The desire is to be doing 10 minutes of local delight that can be properly harvested for the digital – that’s been part of it. The March Break camp was on zoom. The thing that works is bringing communities together on zoom – from Dawson, to Beaver Creek and Whitehorse. We did a bunch of digital storytelling off the top. 99 stories and not about gold! Zoom was a holding space for people telling stories. 

We’re bringing participants into conversations around 3D digital AI spaces. We’re tracking this for other folks as much as for ourselves. We have the best set available and a huge space at Nakai to be used for performances that not a lot of people can get to. Can we create a 3D experience to share the content without flattening them?  We’ll track that work more heavily than before.

Is there a recent achievement, wonderful moment, or quote you’d like to share about your initiative or its impact?

JZ:   We have a one clip – of the puppets on Labour Day night. A person was looking over at the light labyrinth saying ‘life is f*cking grand’.  Just hearing that! We need more chances to say that. It’s a thing art can do. The LTC home moments. Doing the parades – very good for the soul. Dancing around doing jigs – what it’s all about. Not the spread-sheets, or writing grants. It’s a lot of work for 10 minutes of delight, but the parades are lovely moments. Seeing kids and participants untrained, brings delight!

In conversation with Seanna Connell, ArtBridges, sconnell[at]artbridges.ca

Yukon Music Video Program (Reel Youth)

“Sign up for the Yukon Music Video Program! In this partnership with Western Arctic Youth Collective, youth (aged 13-29) in the Yukon Territory will work with Reel Youth facilitators virtually to plan, shoot, edit, and distribute an original music video. Guaranteed fun and no film making experience is necessary!

      In this FREE program, you will:      

          • Learn how to plan, shoot, and edit a short film
          • Receive a $150 honourarium
          • Work creatively with a small group of peers
          • Have fun while staying safe!

Dates: Jan 18, 20, 25, 27 7 and Feb 1 & 3
            from 4-6pm Yukon Time each day

You will need access to a computer, laptop, or tablet. It must be able to run Zoom (details) and Adobe Creative Cloud Express (system requirements: here).

Reel Youth filmmaker-facilitators will help build community and technical filmmaking skills to create videos that will be featured in an online film festival and distributed through Reel Youth’s website and social media channels.”

-from Reel Youth

KIAC Culture Quest: Arts & Culture Funding Program (Yukon)

Culture Quest is an arts and cultural funding program that is supported by the Yukon Government (YG) and administered by the Klondike Institute of Art and Culture (KIAC).

Culture Quest supports the expression of culture and art for Yukon performing, visual, and literary artists to a maximum of $10,000 per applicant per fiscal year. Culture Quest also supports First Nations cultural gatherings and festivals around the Yukon in addition to the preparation of work to be showcased nationally or internationally. The program was developed to address the opportunities of art and culture representation at the Vancouver 2010 Olympics and subsequent events such as Canada Winter Games, Pan Am/Parapan Games and Northern Scene.

Culture Quest supports:

  • Support First Nations, Métis and Inuit expression of art in relation to cultural practices, enriching the lives of all Yukon residents. Such as: projects within cultural festivals and gatherings, song revival projects, story-telling projects, traditional dancing and other activities which involve public appreciation or engagement.
  • Support the continued growth and Support the continued growth and development of creation, performance or presenting capacity in the cultural sector, particularly in underserved communities or sectors. Such as: developing a performance circuit or a curated presentation space.
  • Support opportunities for artists to execute projects that explore and develop ties between contemporary art and their cultural heritage or history.
  • Support Yukon artists to develop or prepare their work for the national or international stage. Such as: mounting or rehearsing a production for a national tour and other preparation activities or preparing for a national cultural event such as cultural contingent for major sporting games, Northern Scene, etc.

Annual Intakes:

Application deadlines are on the 15th of January, April, and September.
Next intake: January 15th, 2022.

For more information and to apply, please visit: https://kiac.ca/culture-quest/

-from KIAC

KIAC Culture Quest: Arts & Culture Funding Program (Yukon)

Culture Quest supports the expression of culture and art for Yukon performing, visual, and literary artists. Culture Quest also supports First Nations cultural gatherings and festivals around the Yukon in addition to the preparation of work to be showcased nationally or internationally. The program was developed to address the opportunities of art and culture representation at the Vancouver 2010 Olympics and subsequent events such as Canada Winter Games, Pan Am/Parapan Games and Northern Scene.

Culture Quest is an arts and cultural funding program supported by the Yukon Government (YG) and administered by the Klondike Institute of Art and Culture (KIAC). The fund is adjudicated by a Selection Committee.

Culture Quest supports:

  • First Nations expression of art in relation to cultural practices. (Such as projects within cultural festivals and gatherings, song revival, story-telling, regalia, traditional dancing, and other activities which involve public appreciation or engagement.)
  • Support the continued growth and development of creation,performance, or presenting capacity in the cultural sector,particularly in under-served communities or sectors. (Such as developing a performance circuit or a curated presentation space.)
  • Support opportunities for artists to create projects that explore and develop ties between contemporary art and their cultural heritage or history. (Such as using a contemporary art form to express, interpret, explore, or study one’s own heritage stories and/or cultural history).
  • Support Yukon artists to prepare their work for the national or international stage(Such as mounting or rehearsing an existing production for a national tour or preparing for a national cultural event such as cultural contingents for major sporting games, Northern Scene, etc. or responding to a significant national or international online opportunity). This objective does not replace the Touring Artist Fund, but enables artists to prepare existing works for world class opportunities outside of Yukon.

Next Intake: April 15th, 2020. Though requests for $1000 or under may be submitted for consideration at any time.”

For more information and to apply, please visit: https://kiac.ca/culture-quest/

-from KIAC

Job Opportunity: Executive Director (Klondike Institute of Art and Culture)

“The Executive Director is Dawson City Arts Society’s (DCAS) chief operating officer, and in partnership with the DCAS Board of Directors, is responsible for the success of the DCAS operating arm, the Klondike Institute of Art and Culture (KIAC). Together, the Executive Director and the Board assure the accomplishment of KIAC’s mission and vision.

This position has a wide range of responsibilities including the management of human and financial resources of the organization and the care and maintenance of the KIAC facility. The position represents the organization in the community and is the liaison with many community stakeholders and partners.

Essential Qualifications

  • A combination of post-secondary education (preferably arts management related) and demonstrated management or senior administrative experience, ideally in an arts related and/or not-for-profit environment reporting to a Board of Directors.
  • Demonstrated experience in financial management, including administration related to project-based and core funding, annual budget preparation, cash flow management, payroll.
  • Demonstrated experience in human resource management, including ability to train, supervise and motivate staff and volunteers.
  • Willing and able to work in a multicultural, diverse and inclusive organization and community. Knowledge and understanding of Tr’ondëk Hwëch’in and/or Indigenous cultures in Canada.
  • Excellent verbal and written communication skills including, but not limited to, word-processing, spreadsheets, email, and media relations.
  • Leadership experience at a senior level with the ability to balance day to day responsibilities while executing high level strategic objectives; effective time management skills.”

For more information, please visit: https://kiac.ca/2021/02/02/kiac-is-hiring-an-executive-director/

-from KIAC

Yukon Emerging Artist Program

“The Yukon Emerging Artist Program is an initiative of the Yukon Arts Centre supported by the RBC Foundation to support the professional development of Yukon artists by creating meaningful mentorship opportunities between emerging and established artists.  

We are pleased to present round two of this initiative. Emerging artists who participated in round one of the program are welcome to participate again. 

During this time of Covid-19, Yukon Arts Centre is proud to continue to support Yukon emerging artists in all genres (visual, performing, literary, and multi-media artistic practices) through our virtual Mentorship Program.

This program will provide honorarium of $500 for mentee and $500 for mentor/collaborator. Yukon emerging artists can apply through this program to propose a virtual mentorship or collaboration with an established CANADIAN artist.  There are no deadlines for completion though projects must be completed within a reasonable time frame.

The application deadline is rolling (ongoing).”

For more information, please visit: https://yukonartscentre.com/artist_opportunities/emerging-artist-program

-from Yukon Arts Centre

KIAC Culture Quest: an arts and cultural funding program (Yukon)

Culture Quest supports the expression of culture and art for Yukon performing, visual, and literary artists. Culture Quest also supports First Nations cultural gatherings and festivals around the Yukon in addition to the preparation of work to be showcased nationally or internationally. The program was developed to address the opportunities of art and culture representation at the Vancouver 2010 Olympics and subsequent events such as Canada Winter Games, Pan Am/Parapan Games and Northern Scene.

Culture Quest is an arts and cultural funding program supported by the Yukon Government (YG) and administered by the Klondike Institute of Art and Culture (KIAC). The fund is adjudicated by a Selection Committee.

Culture Quest supports:

  • First Nations expression of art in relation to cultural practices.
  • The continued growth and development of creation, performance, or presenting capacity in the cultural sector, particularly in underserved communities or sectors.
  • Opportunities for artists to create projects that explore and develop ties between contemporary art and their cultural heritage or history.
  • Yukon artists to prepare their work for the national or international stage.

    Please see the funding guidelines here for detailed information.

ELIGIBILITY

Yukon-based groups, organizations, businesses and residents (persons having lived in Yukon for a minimum of one full year prior to applying) may apply.

Next Intake: September 15th, 2020. Though requests for $1000 or under may be submitted for consideration at any time.”

For more information and to apply, please visit: https://kiac.ca/culture-quest/

-from KIAC

20th Yukon Riverside Arts Festival (August 13-16 & online)

“The Klondike Institute of Art & Culture celebrates the 20th Annual Yukon Riverside Arts Festival on the weekend of August 15 – 16, 2020. Due to the current public health situation, this year’s festival will not be a conventional gathering and will not feature the usual artist demonstrations or main festival site on the banks of the Yukon River at Riverside Park.

Instead, artists from Dawson City and beyond will present installations, exhibitions, performances, film, and audio work in a variety of innovative spaces throughout the community. We ask that everyone adheres to the Yukon’s Chief Medical Officer’s physical distancing guidelines at all times when viewing the work.

Those who do not live in Dawson City or do not feel comfortable viewing the work in person are encouraged to view the artwork and documentation remotely in the form of an online exhibition starting August 17 at YRAF.ca

For more festival details in Dawson and online, please visit: https://yraf.ca/

-from KIAC

Call for Artist Proposals – outdoor, virtual, pre-recorded, and more: Yukon Riverside Arts Festival (KIAC)

“Although the 20th annual Yukon Riverside Arts Festival will not be a conventional gathering, we wish to celebrate Dawson City’s creative spirit by supporting the creation and presentation of new work in manners deemed safe by public health professionals.

The Klondike Institute of Art & Culture is seeking proposals for the presentation of new work in all mediums at the 20th Annual Yukon Riverside Arts Festival around Discovery Days weekend, Aug 13 – 16, 2020. This is an open call to Yukon / Regional artists and collectives at any stage of their artistic practices to propose projects, workshops, cultural practices, installations, performances, writings, film, new media, talks, demonstrations, collaborations, exhibitions, exchanges, questions and connections in whatever shape, duration, platform, mode of distribution you imagine them taking. Proposals can be outdoor, virtual, pre-recorded, and more. Dream and scheme and tell us what you would like to do. Projects large and small will be considered. All projects must adhere to physical distancing guidelines.

We anticipate unknowns, and will rise to the challenge of adapting in new and safe ways
We will not be encouraging large gatherings
We will not be encouraging travel between communities
We will still find ways to connect and create, and to hold each other up”

For more information, please visit: https://kiac.ca/2020/05/25/yukon-riverside-arts-festival-call-for-artist-proposals/

-from Klondike Institute of Art & Culture