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Posts Tagged ‘featured resource’

Sponsorship Marketing | Featured Resource

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In recent years, arts and community organizations have been encouraged to diversify their funding sources and be innovative and entrepreneurial spirit. In response, many groups have begun to explore a new world of corporate sponsorship. Working with the corporate sector often demands a steep learning curve for nonprofit organizations.

Culture Days has created a new resource that addresses this issue. In Sponsorship Marketing: A Study in Engagement for Canadian Artists and Cultural Organizations, Lorraine Patterson, Associate Director of Sponsorship with Stratford Festival, takes the time to explore and explain key trends in the world of fundraising and sponsorship, focusing on sponsorship marketing. As Patterson explains, the world of sponsorship has become more complex, and sponsors are looking for marketing partnerships that provide opportunities for engagement with audiences and communities.

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Designed for ‘sponsorship and fundraising professionals’ and published by Culture Days, this white paper and the accompanying webinar discuss key concepts of sponsorship marketing. The white paper includes definitions of corporate marketing terms, discussion of key trends, valuation, and relationships. It also includes examples of several organizations and their sponsorship marketing approaches. For those who are developing sponsorship proposals but aren’t sure how to place a dollar value on their work, the Sponsorship Marketing Council’s guide to Property Valuation is a useful tool.

Sponsorship Marketing: A Study in Engagement for Canadian Artists and Cultural Organizations was created by Lorraine Patterson and published by Culture Days. You can view the webinar or access the paper online.

To learn about more resources like this, visit the ArtBridges Learning and Resources Section.

-Featured Resource by Skye Louis, ArtBridges Info Resource Developer
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Shapeshifters Video Series | Featured Resource

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Learn from experience of artists who have successfully applied for funding! Shapeshifters is a rich series of video profiles of Indigenous artists speaking about their work, their motivations, and their experience with grants.

The videos feature nine different artists and a wide range of mediums and approaches to art making. The videos include reflections on Indigenous cultural revitalization and the power and benefits of the arts. Each profile also includes helpful tips for artists who are applying for funding. Fans of musicians A Tribe Called Red will want to check out ATCR member Bear Witness talking about his media work and his perspective on preparing grant applications.

Created by the Ontario Arts Council, Shapeshifters features 9 Ontario-based artists: Waawaate Fobister, Christian Chapman, Cheryl L’Hirondelle, Michelle Derosier, Dan Commanda & Brenda Lee, Michael Belmore, Sidd Bobb & Pennie Couchie, Jean Marshall, Bear Witness. The series was edited by Lawrence Jackman and Katahrine Asals with music from Edgardo Moreno. The Shapeshifters series includes French subtitles.

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To learn more about the Shapeshifters Video Series, please visit the ArtBridges Resource Portal.

-Skye Louis, ArtBridges Info Resource Developer
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Educator’s Equity Companion Guide | Harmony Movement

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Harmony Movement has over 15 years of experience working in schools and training educators in relation to equity. The Educator’s Equity Companion Guide is the latest in a series of tools developed by Harmony Movement to support more inclusive schools, workplaces, social services and communities.

The resource guide is divided into 3 main sections. The first section looks at basic concepts related to equity, such as identities and intersectionality, power & privilege, prejudice and discrimination. The concepts are illustrated by stories and reflection/discussion questions. The second section examines the different parts of identity of students and educators, and how these parts of identity relate to concepts of equity. The final section of the resource guide is all about equity and inclusive education, and looks at equity in the classroom, equity-based analysis, and what it means to be an ally.

Intersectionality_HarmonyMovementThis resource guide contains lots of stories and examples of how discrimination, harassment, privilege and systemic barriers play out in the lives of students and teachers on an everyday basis. It will be of particular interest to artist-educators who work within the school system or partner with educators.

A print copy of the Educator’s Equity Companion Guide can be purchased directly from Harmony Movement.This fall, the Companion Guide will also be launched in an e-book version, and will be complemented by a free new online course. The online course includes three modules and allows readers to dig deeper into the issues reflected in each chapter by providing additional resources such as videos, activities and links to websites with more information. Take a look at the Harmony Movement website to see all their guides and workbooks for educators, and contact publications@harmony.ca to place an order.

To learn more about the Educator’s Equity Companion Guide, please visit the ArtBridges Resource Portal.

-Skye Louis, ArtBridges Info Resource Developer
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Public Engagement in the Arts | Featured Resource

“The common themes running through these definitions include the value of personal participation, holistic impacts on people’s lives, encouragement of dialogue between the individual and a work of art, and the role of art in building social capital. The definitions talk about the role of the artist or organization as well as “mediators” in assisting the public in understanding art and attaining greater self-expression and actualization through the transformative power of art.”

– Public Engagement in the Arts, 2012

Created by the Canada Council for the Arts, Public Engagement in the Arts takes a close look at Canadian engagement and participation in the arts. This discussion paper examines different definitions of public engagement and motivations for this type of work. Public Engagement in the Arts includes an overview of Canadian and international cultural policies that relate to public engagement. The paper also considers current trends and potential barriers, and concludes with comments on the Canada Council’s role in shaping current and future developments in public engagement.

“Many arts funders have longstanding commitments to equity of access to programs by artists and arts organizations; how are funders ensuring that the public also has access to content that is equitable in the sense of being from them and for them, without pandering or diluting the quality of the work?”

This resource will be useful to anyone who is interested in exploring or defining concepts of community engagement and participation in the arts, and understanding the context for current funding practices in Canada.

To learn more about the Canada Council for the Arts, please visit www.canadacouncil.ca. To learn more about Public Engagement in the Arts, please visit the ArtBridges Resource Portal.

-Skye Louis, ArtBridges Info Resource Developer
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Mural Production Handbook | Featured Resource

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The Mural Production Handbook is a great resource guide for anyone who is planning or working on a mural project. This is a very detailed resource full of useful information for muralists.

The handbook covers a broad range of topics related to mural production and preservation; it includes tips on fundraising and budget planning before a project even gets started. It also includes a sample artist contract and background information about murals and intellectual property rights. For when the mural is completed, there are marketing tips and a promotional checklist.

The guide also includes helpful information about conservation, and important guidelines for choosing the right site. Detailed information is included about how to prepare and protect the wall, and which materials to use in different situations. Because Mural Routes has well over 20 years of experience in mural production and preservation, the information about longer term maintenance concerns – including northern-specific issues, like snowdrift – is especially valuable. If you are just getting started with public mural projects, this guide gives you the chance to learn from the experience of other muralists.

To become a Mural Routes member or learn more about their work, please visit www.muralroutes.com.
To learn about more the Mural Production Handbook or Mural Routes’ Mural Map of Canada, please visit the ArtBridges Resource Portal.

-Skye Louis, ArtBridges Info Resource Developer
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Read Mural Routes’ profile on ArtBridges’ Community-Engaged Arts Directory and Map

Documenting Community Arts Projects | Featured Resource

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“Given that we evolve by sharing our stories and insights, web projects about community art initiatives contribute to collective knowledge and to the production of community-based histories. Through sharing our projects on-line we can learn from and celebrate a diversity of projects and exchange our approaches to generating healthy communities.”

There are many different motivations for wanting to document a community arts project, and there are many ways to go about it. Artist, art educator, and researcher Pohanna Pyne Feinberg of Inspire Art has taken a close look at approaches to documenting community arts projects and shared the results through a free online toolkit called Documenting Community Arts.

Created in partnership with SKOL-CEDA Community Projects, this resource for community artists presents key ideas related to documenting a project. Inspired by actual community projects and designed for participants of community art projects, this guide will be particularly useful for groups who want to document their projects but don’t have a budget or strong technical skills. These groups will appreciate the basic technical tips and info about tools that are free to use. Included are ideas for how to document work in different mediums (photo, video, text, audio), and some useful resources for pulling everything together and sharing it online. This info is paired with actual examples of image and text-based documentation from SKOL-CEDA projects.

The section about planning for documentation, discussions to have with participants, the sample Distribution Agreement, and notes about inclusive documenting are all relevant to participants of community art projects. For anyone who is interested in learning more about the dynamics of documenting collaborative creative projects, Pohanna Pyne Feinberg’s thesis paper, Making the Invisible Visible: Documenting the creative process, examines documentation in relation to public memory, shared authorship, and social agency.

To learn more about Documenting Community Arts Projects and Making the Invisible Visible, please visit the ArtBridges Resource Portal. To learn more about Pohanna Pyne Feinberg’s work, please visit Inspire Art.

-Skye Louis, ArtBridges Info Resource Developer
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10 Steps to Orchestrate Change | Featured Resource

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Ken Mcleod’s dynamic experience includes several fellowships, four years as a provincial MLA for New Brunswick, and the founding of a nonprofit communications consulting firm. Inspired by El Sistema’s social music programs in Venezuela, Ken now spends his time running children’s orchestra program Sistema in New Brunswick.

In a talk shared with youth from Youth Orchestra of the America’s Global Leaders Summit, Ken has taken the time to break down many of the steps involved in creating the Sistema New Brunswick youth orchestra. Shared in video format, this audio recording is paired with visual slides and also includes an audience question and answer section.

Visit the ArtBridges Map to learn more about Sistema New Brunswick and Sistema Toronto.

To learn more about Ken Mcleod’s 10 Steps to Orchestrate Change, please visit the ArtBridges Resource Portal.

-Skye Louis, ArtBridges Info Resource Developer
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Artist and Community Collaboration | Featured Resource

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The ArtBridges Resource Portal connects you to community arts toolkits and research, reflections and stories, program ideas, and more. These resources have been developed and generously shared by artists and cultural workers in Canada through the course of their work.

‘Each community, artist, and art project will take its own path and will find its own unique destination.’ – Common Weal Community Arts

Created by Common Weal, Artist and Community Collaboration: A Toolkit for Community Projects is designed for artists or community members who are starting or involved in collaborative community projects. This toolkit contains a diverse assortment of resources, ranging from discussion of ideas grounding collaborative work (values, ethical considerations) to a checklist for getting started, planning worksheets, sample consent forms, and icebreaker activities. Divided into 7 main sections (Initiate, Engage, Collaborate, Organize, Strengthen, Sharing, Completion) with special section of tools, templates and activities, this is a very rich resource. Thoughtfully constructed, each section mixes narrative with checklists, case studies, and tips.

Common Weal is a groundbreaking community arts organization that has been based in Saskatchewan for over two decades. Common Weal impacts communities who are under-served or who do not presently access mainstream arts programming and works towards changing the lives of the people involved in a positive way.

For artists or community leaders who are looking for resources, tips and ideas, this toolkit is a real hidden treasure that is not available online. A hard copy can be obtained through the Common Weal office for $15; please contact infocommonweal@sasktel.net to learn more.

To learn more about Artists on Ice and Uprooted Generation, please visit the ArtBridges Resource Portal.

-Skye Louis, ArtBridges Info Resource Developer
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Wapikoni Mobile | Featured Resource

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The Wapikoni Mobile team travels thousands of kilometres every year, bringing mobile film production studios and workshops to indigenous youth in Canada and elsewhere. Wapikoni has been producing films in collaboration with youth since 2004. The organization’s name is a touching tribute to Wapikoni Awashish:

“At the start of the new millennium, director Manon Barbeau wrote a script, with fifteen Atikamekw youth from Wemotaci, for a feature-length film entitled, La fin du mĂ©pris. Among these youth was a woman named Wapikoni Awashish, a positive role model and group leader within her community. In May 2002, when she was only 20 years old and undertaking numerous projects, Wapikoni died in a car accident when her car collided into a truck loaded with wood. Already profoundly touched by the number of youth suicides within the community, Manon Barbeau is devastated by the accidental death of her closest collaborator. Consequently, Manon is inspired to create a mobile studio as a place of assembly, intervention, and audiovisual and musical creation for First Nations youth; she names it Wapikoni Mobile, in honour of Wapikoni Awashish.”Wapikoni.ca

The archived films at Wapikoni.ca represent a diversity of interests, perspectives, and approaches to film making. Andrew Swallow’s Artists on Ice looks at the benefits and meaning that art holds for community members and individuals, while RĂ©al Junior Leblanc’s ‘Uprooted Generation’ is part poem and part documentary, dedicated to the victims of residential schools.

Many of these films are archived on the Wapikoni Mobile site, which showcases the rich legacy of Wapikoni workshops and programming and provides a platform for youth expression and storytelling.

To learn more about Artists on Ice and Uprooted Generation, please visit the ArtBridges Resource Portal.

-Skye Louis, ArtBridges Info Resource Developer
Read past Featured Resource posts.

Artistic Storefronts Toolkit | Featured Resource

Youth Arts Toolkit (ANCY)

The ArtBridges Resource Portal connects you to community arts toolkits and research, reflections and stories, program ideas, and more. These resources have been developed and generously shared by artists and cultural workers in Canada through the course of their work.

Artistic Storefronts are an inspiring way to bring art, business, and community together. Using storefront space to showcase art is an innovative way to enliven existing spaces, and can inspire community members to connect with one another.

Inspired by festivals such as New Glasgow’s Art at Night Festival and the Hamilton Supercrawl, Arts Network for Children and Youth (ANCY) has published a special toolkit for youth who want to get started on planning their own downtown arts festival. Created by Rikhee Strap, How to Set Up and Create Artistic Storefronts lists some clear and easy-to-follow approaches to connect with businesses and activate empty storefronts with art.

National Youth Arts Week (organized by ANCY) takes place annually in May, and is an ideal time for youth to connect with businesses and maybe even start up a festival in their community.

To learn more about How to Set Up and Create Artistic Storefronts, please visit the ArtBridges Resource Portal.

-Skye Louis, ArtBridges Info Resource Developer

Read past Featured Resource posts.